Restless Legs Syndrome

Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also called Willis-Ekbom Disease, causes unpleasant or uncomfortable sensations in the legs and an irresistible urge to move them.  Symptoms commonly occur in the late afternoon or evening hours, and are often most severe at night when a person is resting, such as sitting or lying in bed.  They also may occur when someone is inactive and sitting for extended periods (for example, when taking a trip by plane or watching a movie).  Since symptoms can increase in severity during the night, it could become difficult to fall asleep or return to sleep after waking up.  Moving the legs or walking typically relieves the discomfort but the sensations often recur once the movement stops.

Patients with RLS feel the irresistible urge to move, which is accompanied by uncomfortable sensations in their lower limbs that are unlike normal sensations experienced by people without the disorder.  The sensations in their legs are often difficult to define but may be described as aching throbbing, pulling, itching, crawling, or creeping.  These sensations less commonly affect the arms, and rarely the chest or head.  Although the sensations can occur on just one side of the body, they most often affect both sides.  They can also alternate between sides. The sensations range in severity from uncomfortable to irritating to painful.

Because moving the legs (or other affected parts of the body) relieves the discomfort, people with RLS often keep their legs in motion to minimize or prevent the sensations.  They may pace the floor, constantly move their legs while sitting, and toss and turn in bed.

A classic feature of RLS is that the symptoms are worse at night with a distinct symptom-free period in the early morning, allowing for more refreshing sleep at that time.  Some people with RLS have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep.  They may also note a worsening of symptoms if their sleep is further reduced by events or activity.

RLS symptoms may vary from day to day, in severity and frequency, and from person to person.

More than 80 percent of people with RLS also experience periodic limb movement of sleep (PLMS).  PLMS is characterized by involuntary leg (and sometimes arm) twitching or jerking movements during sleep that typically occur every 15 to 40 seconds, sometimes throughout the night.  Although many individuals with RLS also develop PLMS, most people with PLMS do not experience RLS.

Carmen Care Advance Laser Therapy Laser Energy Detoxification Protocol plus specific designed photobiomodulation protocols help these patients significantly decreasing their clinical symptomatology.